Science/Nature

TEDWomen: Vibrations offer new way to track elephants

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Researchers have come up with a new way of tracking elephants, via the vibrations that the animals make.Scientists Dr Beth Mortimer and Prof Tarje Nissen-Meyer discovered that elephants generate vibrations through their normal movements and through vocalisations, known as "rumbles".These can be measured by techniques usually used for studying earthquakes.The Oxford academics spoke about their research at the TEDWomen conference currently under way in California.They
Science/Nature

New Zealand beached whales: Why are so many getting stranded?

[ad_1] Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionAlmost 150 whales die in mass stranding The pictures are striking: dozens of whales lie stranded on an idyllic beach in a remote part of New Zealand.The group were found by a walker on Stewart Island earlier this week. And just a few days later, a further 51 pilot whales died after becoming stranded on a beach on the Chatham Islands.While
Science/Nature

Whales stranded in New Zealand: Another 50 pilot whales die

[ad_1] Image copyright DoC Image caption The only surviving whale was too badly injured to be saved Fifty-one pilot whales have died after becoming stranded on a beach on the Chatham Islands off New Zealand.The mass stranding means more than 200 whales have died in separate incidents over the past week in the region.New Zealand's Department of Conservation says between 80 and 90 whales were found to have become stranded
Science/Nature

Climate change: Australian students skip school for mass protest

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Protests were scheduled in 27 places across Australia Thousands of Australian school students have urged greater action on climate change in protests across the country.The students skipped school on Friday to highlight what they say are inadequate climate policies by the Australian government.On Monday, Australian PM Scott Morrison rebuked their plans for "activism" during school hours and insisted his government was tackling climate
Science/Nature

Extinction crisis: Five things you should know

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption One of the last remaining rhinos of its kind The world's in the midst of an extinction crisis, with plants and animals being lost at a rate not seen since the demise of the dinosaurs. At the end of a key international conference, BBC News spoke to Cristiana Pașca Palmer, executive secretary of the UN Convention on Biological Diversity, about global efforts to
Science/Nature

Satellites warn African farmers of pest infestations

[ad_1] Image copyright Sven Torfinn / Panos Pictures Image caption "Plant doctors" can now give local farmers that pest infestations are on their way so they can take precautions UK researchers have developed an early warning system to prevent the crops of African farmers from being devastated. The Pest Risk Information Service (Prise) combines temperature data and weather forecasts with computer models. It then sends farmers a mobile phone alert
Science/Nature

Carmichael project: Visiting Australia’s controversial Adani mine

[ad_1] Image caption The mine project is on a piece of barren land Indian energy giant Adani has announced that it will begin work on a controversial coal mine project in Australia. Earlier this year, BBC Hindi's Vineet Khare visited the area and details what he witnessed there.The route to the Carmichael mine is a long lonely ride in the wilderness - a paved road transforms into a wide dirt
Science/Nature

Climate change: Can 12 billion tonnes of carbon be sucked from the air?

[ad_1] Image caption Slag heaps may have the potential to absorb CO2 Is it remotely feasible to remove 12 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide from the air? Every year. For decades to come.That's the challenge posed by the latest conclusions of the UN's climate science panel.It says that only by pulling this heat-trapping gas out of the atmosphere can we avoid dangerous climate change.But according to one leading researcher, there's