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Climate change: Last four years are ‘world’s hottest’

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images The year 2018 is on course to be the fourth warmest on record, according to the World Meteorological Organization.It says that the global average temperature for the first 10 months of the year was nearly 1C above the levels between 1850-1900. The State of the Climate report says that the 20 warmest years on record have been in the past 22 years, with the 2015-2018
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Climate change: ‘It is a global issue we are all failing’

[ad_1] The UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres has warned that the rise of nationalism around the world has reduced the political will of some countries to work collectively to tackle global warming. Ahead of the G20 summit in Argentina, and also a UN climate change conference in Poland next week, the so-called COP24, he urged all political leaders to make reducing climate change a priority. He was speaking exclusively to
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Climate change: EU aims to be ‘climate neutral’ by 2050

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images The European Union says it is aiming to become the first major economy to go "climate neutral" by 2050. Under the plan, emissions of greenhouse gases after that date would have to be offset by planting trees or by burying the gases underground.Scientists say that net-zero emissions by 2050 are needed to have a fighting chance of keeping global temperatures under 1.5C this century.The EU
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Seal colony in Norfolk expects more than 2,700 pups

[ad_1] England's largest grey seal colony could see record numbers of new arrivals this pupping season.They are born at Blakeney Point in Norfolk during November, December and early January, and numbers have risen quickly, from about 25 pups born in 2001 to more than 2,700 in 2017.Nearly 2,000 pups have been born there already this season.The shingle spit is a nature reserve managed by the National Trust, which fences off
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From burping cows and food miles to greenhouse gasses

[ad_1] The global livestock population is at an all-time high of 28 billion animals, and animal agriculture is the highest source of greenhouse gases methane and nitrous oxide. The amount of methane produced by livestock farming is predicted to rise by 60 percent over the next 11 years, which could be catastrophic for combating climate change. So what changes should we make to our eating habits?David Shukman reports. [ad_2] Source
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The two Swedish mums who want people to give up flying for a year

[ad_1] Two Swedish mums have persuaded 10,000 people to commit to not taking any flights in 2019.Their social media initiative, No-fly 2019 (Flygfritt 2019), is aiming for 100,000 pledges, and has been asking participants to post their reasons for signing up.Maja Rosen and her neighbour Lotta Hammar say they started the campaign to show politicians what needs to be done to halt climate change.Direct emissions from aviation account for about
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UK’s first carbon capture and storage project ‘operational by mid 2020s’

[ad_1] Image copyright North Sea Midstream Partners Image caption The St Fergus Gas Terminal is involved in the Acorn Project The UK's first carbon capture and storage project should be operational by the mid-2020s, according to ministers.A commitment to develop the technology, which stops greenhouse gases entering the atmosphere, was made ahead of a summit in Edinburgh.Research funding has also been announced for a carbon capture scheme in Aberdeenshire.It will
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Climate change: CO2 emissions rising for first time in four years

[ad_1] Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Carbon emissions have not yet peaked in many countries the report says Global efforts to tackle climate change are way off track says the UN, as it details the first rise in CO2 emissions in four years.The emissions gap report says that economic growth is responsible for a rise in 2017 while national efforts to cut carbon have faltered.To meet the goals of
Science/Nature

‘Siberian unicorn’ walked Earth with humans

[ad_1] Image copyright W S Van der Merwe Image caption Artist's impression of the 'forgotten beast' A giant rhino that may have been the origin of the unicorn myth survived until at least 39,000 years ago - much longer than previously thought.Known as the Siberian unicorn, the animal had a long horn on its nose, and roamed the grasslands of Eurasia.New evidence shows the hefty beast may have eventually died